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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 198 (some duplicates have been removed)
. that is we had a very tough election, in which fundamental issues were debated, the rights of gay and lesbian people, the right to vote because of the assault on the fundamental right to vote that took place in so many states, climate change, a continuation of our commitment to think medicare and social security and the noes thtion th inequality is not a necessary component of the economy. and we want to believe all of those issues. and i think what the president was saying, was, look, we have elections. and when you have a full debate in an election and the outcome is pretty clear cut, then it's his obligation and his right to move forward on all of those issues. >> and as we are watching the navajo nation just went by, their float, one of the things i saw today, melissa, is the whole changing of the demographics of america was reflected at the inauguration, as we look at native americans float goes by, as we heard a president for the first time refer in an inaugural address to same-sex marriage and to gay rights and talking about gender rights and he was sworn in on martin luther king's bib
mouse gimmick to win elections without having to win with the most number of votes. rebel all of those cuts and the effort to make it harder for people to vote, all of that targeting to vote in ways that people don't like voting? well, now they're trying something new. they don't like states like pennsylvania that regularly vote democratic. so some kwauk thougquack thaugo to give the rural votes more power. their decided to kill the power of how the real state goes overall. if they can't get people to vote for them, they try to kill the power of those who don't. will they get away with it? not if you stay tuned and keep an eye on these little buggers. they've got their mickey mouse ears on. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. >> thanks, chris. and thanks to you for tuning in. tonight's lead, president obama won. this president has no time to waste and he's using it to push for change on gun control, on immigration, on climate change, on ending the ban on women serving in combat. he's got a full agenda. and it was on full display today. remember all of that bluster from
's list, held a banquet for some of the newly elected female representatives. house democratic leader nancy pelosi addressed the gathering and the new 113th congress has 20 women now serving in the u.s. senate. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, everyone in. thank you very much. [applause] thank you. this, being a sunday morning, i want to begin by saying that this is the data god has made, that us rejoice and be glad. let us rejoice and be glad that as we gather here in the white house, barack obama is being officially sworn in as the president of the united states. earlier this day, joe biden was sworn in as vice president of the united states. tomorrow, it will be a ceremonial, but today it is official. what a great day. what a great day that we are celebrating emily's list success in strength in numbers. women leading the way. isn't that exciting? 15 more women senators in the united states senate. that is remarkable. in this cycle, we have 80 more democratic women in the house bringing our number to 61 women in the house. [applause] you hear a lot about how peo
's nominations today a perfect example of how elections have consequences? >> well, sitting where i'm sitting, not in the clint eastwood chair, i would say yes, it certainly does. it's a case of continuing a very tough policy of enforcement at the sec. so the president is sending a signal that at least in this area of regulation enforcement, he's not going to be backing down at all. surely, that's exactly what wall street and corporate america expected when he won that election. >> and that was the way he campaigned. in many ways, we're looking at, joan, him continuing the path that he campaign ds oed on, gots on and won. look at the poll on rights for gay people, 60%. on aid to the poor, 59%, on tax levels for millionaires and big corporation, 59%. women's issue, 55%. immigration, 55%. i mean, these are high numbers of people feeling the gop is out of touch on these issues. >> yeah, i mean, reverend al, the shocking thing is, as you just laid out, the support for democratic policies is even h h higher than support for democratic politicians. the president won a decisive victory, but the sup
as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we are celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president, what we are doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's make sure to work as hard as we can to pass on an america that is worthy, not only of our past, but also of our future. god bless you. i love you. we will see you tomorrow. [applause] ♪ ["we take care of our own"] ♪ ♪ ["only in america"] ♪ >> as part of our inauguration fightge, the u.s. army's and drum corps -- they will escort president obama down pennsylvania avenue during the inaugural parade. ♪ [drum line] >> it began in april with the production team. it prepares the materials, the music, the drill that we do. parade marching does not require quadrilles, but we do a great deal of research with 18th-century music portrayed on modern instruments that aren't -- that are reminiscent of instruments during the revolutionary war. the rangers a range of vignettes -- are arranged vignettes music from the 18th century that has m
elections. he was asked if the president has met his expectations during the first term. >> he has seen the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congre
, not as significant, but i have to ask you, isn't an african-american winning re-election as president actually just as significant as winning election in the first place? >> no doubt about it, martin. a lot of people were saying that the first time was some type of fluke, that barack obama just outsmarted folks for one time, but you got to remember what he dealt with. every single thing he did, martin, was opposed by the republicans, everything, everything. he had one of the worst economies in many, many years. he had all kinds of catastrophes and people forget about the bp spill, forget about the economy, they forget about all the jobs we were losing, forget about the unemployment rate at the time he was running for office. but yet and still -- and don't forget voter suppression, voter suppression, all kinds of efforts to strike out early voting, and yet and still he still had a tremendous victory. and i think that was reaffirming. it really was because i think it made a lot of people feel that, first of all, americans got it, they understood what he had gone through, they wanted to reward him for
to do this by e elect trail means. they had to win an election. they weren't confidence about that. there was an incredible a. para military violence that went in to. and the results very uneven. thag how they went out of the union. what proceeded that? when you're in a meeting and everything unanimous. don't you get suspicious? i do. there was a lot of back story to how thigh pulled it off. other places the back story showed. in alabama the up country representative just charged they were being run out of the union with that democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia looked tat and said no ordinary farmer has voted for this. they have run us out of the union without the consideration of democratic process. i think it's interesting it's revealing what democracy was and innocent a slave regime in 1860. they called it a democracy. they sometimes often made the case what they wanted was a republican and democracy was mob of course sei. it was part of the reason they wanted out of the union. they didn't like the direction it was going. they had to play the game to get
presidential election. that was the election that cut short poppy bush's time in office, right? he was only a one-term president because he lost in 1992. democrats like to remember 1992 as a triumphant year for the democratic party because there was this young arkansas democratic governor bill clinton unseating an incumbent republican president. the uncomfortable part of that memory for democrats is that even though bill clinton did beat president bush in 1992 he did so with only 43% of the vote. bill clinton got 43% of the vote that year. president bush got 37% of the vote. and even though it is always a bad idea to do math on television, this one isn't that hard. if you add up 43 and 37 you do not get anywhere near 100% of the vote. what happened to the rest of the vote? the wacky thing about the 1992 election in terms of thinking about american binary red versus blue party politics is that another guy who ran that year, a third person, got almost 20% of the vote. it was ross perot, right? giant sucking sound. ross perot got a very large proportion of the vote for a third-party candidate.
that struck me about this conversation is something that we learn about harvey milk. when he was first elected, he understood the significance of his election. i would like to share with you a part of what he said. it goes, the hope speech often talk about. this is what he said to use his own words: "two days after i was elected i got a phone call and the voice was quite young. it was from al tuna, pennsylvania. the person said things. you have to elected a people so that young child and thousands of people know that there is hope for a better tomorrow." without hope, gays, blacks, seniors, the "ss" give up. without hope life is not worth living. harvey closed, and you and you and you. you have to give them hope. as i think about this, i really think that that is what we are talking about. in this measure. we are talking about giving hope to so many people who live in parts of this country, parts of the world where they cannot fathom being true to who they are; they cannot fathom being honest to themselves let alone other people about their sexual orientation. something that struck me about
as a permanent campaign, where everyday is election day in campaigning and election may make for uncompromising minds. you stand in your principles, mobilize your base, drawing endless amounts of money. 20 for seven new site will cover his politics is that it's a horserace and the horse are on steroids coming in to fund the campaign. but we mean by the uncompromising mindset is a minor that cared towards election and not towards governing. >> host: president gutmann come at you right to chew in your co-author, dennis thompson as we observe the changing scene in american politics, we came to believe the general problem could be addressed by concentrating on a particular institution, the united states congress. why is that? >> guest: if you want to see the problem with the uncompromising mindset, look no further than the 112th congress in washington. gridlock, nothing gets past the least legislation in the last 50 years. why? everybody's campaigning all the time. there's very little by way of relationships across the aisle and we ran up to a break of the debt ceiling crisis in compromise was reac
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
it that necessarily in your face but he was standing by some things he felt he got elected on but how will it be perceived? some republicans have already said they are not happy. >> he was direct, blunt, and aggressive. this was an address where the president said i won the election, and i am be aggressive in the second term to push my agenda. republicans will not be happy. democrats will be fired up about the idea high could be a bit more aggressive the second term than in the first term. folks on the left are happy he got health care reform done. that he got the stimulus. a lot of democrats believe he did not go hard enough against the republicans in the first time. to become the first president to use the word "gay" in an address or to defend entitlement programs at a time when everyone in washington is talking about debt and deficits, he threw down the gauntlet and made clear, i won the election, i will stand for these following things. he did not go in great detail. he does that next month. he made clear he is coming out where he is and he will come out swinging and he thinks he
that the 2012 election is a definitive test of your proposition. the reason is obama did not have a opponent who presented a clear and strong argument for reagan knight perspective of stronger government, less taxes, less dependency. you know, romney was a good man but he basically ran on the economy, lousy economy, we need a new ceo in washington. it didn't work. i think we will get a good tis of this in 2016. we are going to have the four years of obama's hyper liberalism, the kind of stuff he elucidated and enuns dated yesterday in the inaugural address. and i would say that if our ideology, conservative, small government ideology is correct, it will leave a mess behind. but we will also need as conservatives, republicans if you like, a standard bearer in 2016 who can make the case. and there is not a dearth of them. we have a very strong bench. we have got ryan. we have got rubio. we have got the governors, there is a whole young generation of conservatives who can make the case that will be the test. although i will say that if liberals keep winning elections, then your theory of a fundamen
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
of the tea party caucus. the president won an election that many say he shouldn't have won given the sluggish recovery. he beat your party. democrats beat a bit more in the senate. do you feel republicans need to change in the second obama term? >> i think a few of them are, john, and i'm certainly not. those of us who won an election, we see our constituents as deserving the best representation we can give them. we won elections too. this is an interesting day today, this peaceful transfer, a constitutional way of the power and vision by our founding fathers, and they understood the separation of powers. they knew there was going to be a clash in the confrontation and a struggle between the parties, but we also know we have to run this government. it's going to be interesting as this unfolds. this should be a healing day. then tomorrow morning, we can start that harder work you mentioned. >> reporter: let's talk about the harder work. some of it divides your party internally. other parts divide his party internally. there's been a talk that maybe immigration reform is a place there could be
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
and claim vindication in the election. >> does a speechwriter write a draft and the president marks it up, sends it back? does the president write the first draft or sketch out an outline and speechwriter fills in the blanks? >> it's different for each president and circumstance. the worst speeches are always the state of the union addresses because everybody sees them coming a year in advance. by four years into the administration with a president who is a known accomplished writer and somebody who is proud and pride full of his literary accomplishments i'm sure he's had ideas for this. >> and close to his own speechwriter who has been with him a long time, they have a good relationship. there will be that give and take. >> at the end of the day when the speech is over, you will consider it a success if? >> if people feel better about america. i hope first it's short and second makes them feel better about the country and times they live in. >> i think if he calls attention to real problems in honest ways, but then asserts there's hope beyond the divisions of our current politics. >> tha
was so influential, the republican congress named him an honorary member after the 1994 election. >> the people that listen to ten hours of talk radio a week or more voted republican by a three-two-one margin. those are the people that elected the new congress. that's why this is the limbaugh congress. >> as of today, i think we can finally put this book where it belongs in history. right there. the american people have put the brakes on the conservative train that has run over a lot of people in this country. president obama has laid down a different track for america. the president's inauguration yesterday served as proof of a real movement in this country. we are a society now of tolerance, fairness, and acceptance. the country is not afraid of progressive values, or to say the word, liberal, because most of the country believes in progressive liberal values. a majority of americans believe gaye marriage should be legal. most people don't want any cuts whatsoever to social security. even more people want medicare left alone. only 33% want to protect defense spending. on immigr
the election season. he went on at a time of deficits being front and center to talk about debt and deficits on capitol hill. he was very aggressive defending entitlement such as social security and medicare and medicaid. in this address, the president signals he believes he has a mandate. he will be aggressive about pushing change in the second term. >>shepard: some of the change, can you make the argument it could happen? republicans are coming around on immigration issues. the polls suggest gay rights issue is taking a turn, as well, right? >>reporter: no question. he was able to pass the health care bill in the first term. the second term, in part, will be about implementing that law that republicans opposed but, obviously, chief justice roberts was the justice that helped decide that, in fact, it is the law of the land. the president, we should note, suggested he is going to reach out to republicans. he started the day at st. john's church across lafayette park, a little prayer service, and the pastor talked about how the pastor in chief in recent days in places like newtown, connecticu
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
, the question is what urgency to do they place on that. we had an election two months ago where there were two candidates, one was more focused on cutting the deficit and reducing our long term debt and one didn't think it was a big concern. the one who didn't think it was a big concern won the election. yes, voters seem to say that is an issue they agree with, but when it came to election day two months ago that certainly wasn't one of the top issues they voted on because they voted for the candidate who wasn't embody go it. >> heather: through his actions, as well. that leads to this, how f or if it should be raised? should the debt limit be raised again, 23% say yes, but 69% don't agree with the president. they say raise it only after major cuts. there again what cuts would those be but president obama as we know he increased the debt by $6 trillion in his if you are four years. some say that administration overspent by one trillion a year every year since he's been in office. now she demanding the get ceiling to be increased again. do you think he will be listen to the 69% that say only af
for its two-time elected democratic president, to say nothing of the first african-american president, it brings together all of the best about this country. >> jennifer: you can see where they're playing from. they just had a shot of actually -- actually from inside the view of a tuba. they had a shot of them, they're up on the platform which is elevated, right. overlooking the mall. so it is a beautiful spot for them to be. right above them is where the president will take the oath. that's where all of the elected officials are seated, where they're seated as well. marine band will be playing for quite awhile here. almost an hour of the lead up to the inauguration. >> it is an aaron sorkin kind of day. west wing kind of day. a day where ritual and politics becomes an important part of keeping the democratic tradition alive. as someone who sometimes sat on the cynical side of things. clearly, it is a representation of the imperial presidency. >> jennifer: we're seeing dick durbin walking right now into the steps, as he's going up, he was obviously a lead player in so much of the putt
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are watching live, we encourage you to do questions and we will try to get them on air and have them answered for
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 198 (some duplicates have been removed)